Unmet Financial Need, Washington Media Scholarship, and Paying for A Professional Doctorate, Psy.D.


Listen to the episode:

This July 11 episode we have our Question and Answer Segment with Kristen Ferguson, discuss the the Federal TEACH Grant Program, talk to The Washington Media Scholars Foundation, and define Unmet Need.

Download The Episode: Ep10 July 11, 2012

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35 thoughts on “Unmet Financial Need, Washington Media Scholarship, and Paying for A Professional Doctorate, Psy.D.”

    1. Keke,

      Thank you for your email. The limit on financial aid depends on three factors:

      Your expected family contribution
      The state you live in and attend school in
      The cost to attend your university

      Please reply to this and let me know what state up you live in and where you go to school and your efc so I can help figure out what the upper limits are for you.

      Regards

      Jr

      Like

    1. You can but you’ll have to send in a copy of their foreign tax return one copy of the original and another translated line for line

      Like

    2. Selena,

      Yes, you can. As long as you are a citizen, or legal permanent resident, you can’t receive financial aid. You simply need to submit the same information as other students. If your parents do not have a social security number, you will disclose that to your financial aid office and they will likely flag you for review. Just bring in the information you have and that they request and you should be fine.

      Regards

      Jr

      Like

    1. Hello Cua,

      no, you should be seeking scholarships for every year of college, and never stop doing so! You should always focus on finding scholarships at all times during the year, as this is the key to fully funding your Education without debt. As an undergrad, I accumulated no debt of any kind. This is due to constantly searching for aid. Keep looking and never quit.

      Regards

      Nr

      Like

  1. My brother decided to go to college and is filing his FAFSA should I send in an amended FAFSA and will that help me qualify for more aid?

    Like

    1. Hello Laura,

      Actually, yes you should actually if your brother is under 24 years old. But before you send in an amended FAFSA, try contacting your financial aid office first and see if they can account for it at their level. It is easier to get this done and less disruptive to your financial aid. Call your financial aid advisor, and let them know you brother will be attending full time next semester and that you need an EFC recalculation done. they will let you know what you need to provide to do this, and will take it from their. your brother could be the key to you receiving alot more aid with a lowered EFC.

      regards

      Mjr

      Like

    1. Damian,

      The following website is one I like because it is so spot on and accurate

      http://www.savingforcollege.com/tutorial101/the_real_cost_of_higher_education.php

      As you can see from this site, the cost of a private schools is more than three times the cost of a public university. On average, public is around $33k total for four years on average, but this varies from state to state. However, private schools are at around $160k total.

      As I always say, public is always cheaper than private.

      Regards,

      Jr

      Like

    1. Rico,

      Public universities and colleges are partially subsidized by the state government to keep tuition low. This includes universities such as university of Illinois, university of California system, State University of New York or SUNY, and so forth. A private has higher tuition because they receive no direct state money to help pay for operations, and can often be more expensive. While there have been many articles about how it’s more costly to go UCLA over Harvard, the truth is most private colleges do not provide so much aid that they can beat the cost of a state university. A good rule of thumb is that other than the current UNiversity of california system, it is almost always cheaper to go to a public university over private.

      Regards

      Jr

      Like

  2. If it comes to point time that i have to get a student loan to pay for my tuition, which is a smarter choice a private student loan or a parent plus loan?

    Like

    1. Plus loans have the advantage of working under federal rules for grace periods and interest rates: private loans do not. Never get a private loan if you can avoid it. Also, when it comes to loans, I have a good rule of thumb: never take out more loans than amount you will receive in your first years salary in whatever career you are entering.

      Good luck

      Jr

      Like

    2. Plus loans operate under rules set by the federal govt. this includes interest caps, grace periods, and income based repayment. This is not true of private loans which could care less if you have money troubles. Avoid private loans at all costs.

      Regards

      Jr

      Like

    1. Alexis,

      Anything you qualified for before you transferred with regard to public funds will still be available if your efc has not gone up. Private scholarships you were awarded should be transferable as long as you transfer to an accredited institution. As for institutional aid such as internal tuition scholarships, those are unique to the school and do not transfer, however many schools have scholarships for those that are just for transfer students to encourage them to attend and keep their graduation rates higher. Check with the institution you are transferring to to see what they have available.

      Regards
      Jr

      Like

    1. Kristel,

      The very first thing you should do is begin your hunt. This is often the most tedious, yet most critical part of the effort. First start with “the ultimate scholarship guide” by the Tannabees. Their book is one of the best and you can often find it at the library. Then move online to capex.com, Scholarshippoints.com, Fastweb.com, and sallemae.com’s search engines to find aid. Then check with the school you are or will be attending about scholarships.

      What is your major by the way?

      Regards

      Je

      Like

  3. If you can’t get financial aid because of how low your GPA. Is there anything else you can do to get money for school/tuition?

    Like

    1. Tiffany,

      Well, let’s rephrase the question to help get it into perspective:

      Financial aid is different from just scholarships. Federal and state financial aid only require a 2.0 for minimal standards. Scholarship shave varying standards. However I have seen scholarships with no GPA requirement, or some as low as 2.5. So don’t think a low GPA will always kill your application. Rather, use it to make focus on ending the best package and essay you can when applying for scholarships. what may I ask is your current school and GPA cumulative and semester?

      Regards,

      Jr

      Like

  4. I am currently on the hunt for more scholarships. Is there a “season” or a period where scholarships contests or applications are mostly held? I found that many ended around march or may.

    Like

  5. Hi, I am an only child. We live in Miami, and my parents made $67,000 combined last year. I am starting as a freshman this year at the local college and we applied for financial aid, however, the only aid I was given is $600 per semester. Although it seems that my parents are making enough money, $600 is truly not enough. Do they take the cost of living, cars, insurance, etc., into consideration when they look at the numbers, or is it all cookie cutter type process? Where can I look for mire grants? In the meantime I am applying for every scholarship I find but I’m not the only one applying.

    Like

    1. Hi Amanda,

      I know it can be frustrating, I have been there myself. However, there is hope. But let’s start with the reality. You are absolutely correct, in they the process can be somewhat “cookie cutter” and the same formula is applied to all students that are dependents with few exceptions. They don’t really take into account the cost of living. So as we both know, living in Miami is expensive. And the $67k your parents made would have the same result on your financial aid regardless if you lived in the Miami, or Carterville, IL (look it up, cheap but tiny lol).

      However we need to review what your filing looked like when you filed and what the circumstances are now. What was your EFC this year. Has either parent lost their job this year, or changed jobs? Has either been laid off, furloughed, or had a work slow down. In essence, for whatever reason, are your parents making less this year than last year? if so, you should appeal your financial aid award by contacting the financial aid office immediately and asking about the appeal procedure. Follow their instructions and seek a favorable result. Don’t worry, nothing can happen to you, and you won’t lose any aid you have already gained.

      you also didn’t mention whether you are attending school next year full time, or part time: this also affects your aid level and aid offered.

      Now as to scholarships, don’t panic. Many students just like you think “so many are applying that there is no way I can win”. These people then either don’t bother, or simply do a poor job on the application package because they have a poor attitude. But those that take a positive, proactive approach tend to fare much better Jin the long run. Now is the time to get positive and start the effort for more aid. Let’s start with a few obvious ones:

      First, the Hispanic Scholarship Fund is a great place to start. They have not only the general scholarship for all majors, but more specific ones for students such as “first in their family” college attendees, science and technology, and other fields as well. Go to HSF.net to check them out. Also, check out HispanicFund.org to see if you have a major that fits into the target group they are looking for.

      No matter what, don’t give up hope, or stop looking. If you like, you can send me additional details such as the school you are attending, high school GPA, and your intended major so we can get the ball rolling.

      Good luck, and good hunting,

      JR

      Like

      1. Thanks so much for the quick response. In answer to some of your questions, my EFC is 05773. There have no financial changes at home, neither good or bad. I plan to attend full time, so long as I can have the grant of $600. We were informed today, that although I “qualify” I may not receive it due to funds running out and those in need receiving first. I’m not giving up on scholarships especially since there are so many. I have submitted over 20 applications so far, and with your suggestions will not take advantage of the Hispanic Scholarship Fund too.
        Thanks again!

        Amanda

        Like

        1. Amanda,

          Ok, lets see what we can do. You see you have a low EFC, but it needs to get below 4995 to be pell eligible. So the question is why your efc hit that level. Have you appealed your financial aid at all? An issue you may have had you didn’t know about is if you or your parents had money in your checking or savings accounts when filling you were both assessed on those. If you have less now that could make a difference. Let me know if I am on the money on this.

          regards

          JR

          Like

        2. Amanda,

          Definitely appeal, let them know about all of your financial circumstances. Don’t give up and fight as hard as you can, but keep looking for other aid as well.

          Regards

          Jr

          Like

  6. I am a single mom with a bachelor degree, but I want to further my education. Would I be eligble for financial aid?

    Like

    1. Angela,

      There is financial aid for those with a degree, but your intended major accounts for a lot. What is your intended major and career path. Also, what is your undergraduate degree. Being a single mom helps you in the financial aid arena, but its important to nail down where you’re going.Let me know ASAP so I can help craft a solution for you.

      Regards

      JR

      Like

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