How To Compare Your Expected Salary Based On College Major

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One of the issues many college graduates have is the fact that there are too many students in the job market in so many categories that they are taking jobs outside their major that pay poorly. Luckily for the students of Florida, a little line slipped into a bill a couple of years ago is helping to create a website to give students cleaner and more accurate information on Job prospects and salaries expected based on actual measured outcomes of the various college majors. Beyond Education which is going to be put out by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (twitter @FLDEO), will give students results in a simple format showing the actually wage amounts based on various points of data such as government, university, and other sources. Its not yet in beta, but should be interesting when it comes out.

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Where to Find Scholarships for Coding: Bloc.io and the New Relic Scholarship

Cappex.com ScreenshotThis January 29th,  2014 episode we discuss our upcoming interview with Cappex.com (@Cappex) about their online scholarship search tool. We also talk about Bloc.io, (@TryBloc) an online school for prospective web coding students that has a unique scholarship available.  We also discuss Beyond  Education, a website that helps to gauge student success outcomes by reviewing salaries. And we finish out our interview about college costs and admission  with Carolyn Z Lawrence, of AdmissionsAdvice.com (@CZLAW) a Private College Admissions Counselor based in San Diego, CA. Carolyn helps students from across the US with the admissions process and how talks to us about the love-affair of admissions, how to find the right fit, and how to honestly look at what you can afford for your child. !

Listen to the episode: [audio https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/cmmwordpress/Podcasts/episode14-5.mp3]

Download The Episode: Ep14-05 January 29, 2014

Coding Scholarship for Veterans & Women From Bloc for $1500

Bloc ScreenshotWith all of new methods of learning that have nothing to do with actually going to a class, its frustrating that so few offer help to pay for it. However I just found a scholarship for an online web-developer course from a company known as Bloc,(twitter @trybloc). Bloc offers mentored online-learning methods for students that match up the self-paced with guidance several times a week.

They teach the big hitters such as Ruby on Rails, HTML, CSS, Javascript in Bloc’s intense 12-week Web Development apprenticeship.

The scholarship targets those not usually found in the coding fields such as Veterans, women, and members of minority groups. It must be said the tuition is not cheap, but is manageable with a scholarship like this. Check out the application at https://www.bloc.io/scholarships/new and apply, as several will be awarded each month.

How to Find The Right Fit In The College Admissions Process: Carolyn Lawrence and AdmissionsAdvice.com, Private Admissions Counselors, and Scholarships for Military Spouses

AdmissionsAdvice.comThis January 22th,  2014 episode we talk about college costs and admission  with Carolyn Z Lawrence, a Private College Admissions Counselor based in San Diego, CA. Carolyn helps students from across the US with the admissions process and how talks to us about the love-affair of admissions, how to find the right fit, and how to honestly look at what you can afford for your child. We also discuss financial aid for those with financial issues between semesters!

Listen to the episode: [audio https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/cmmwordpress/Podcasts/episode14-4.mp3]

Download The Episode: Ep14-04 January 22, 2014

The risk of promising your child that “we’ll find a way to pay” for college

I have to agree wholeheartedly with this article: Don’t write checks you can’t cash when it comes to education.

Cost of College

Don’t make promises you cannot keep.

In the college search and selection process, parents should think very carefully before assuring their child that “we’ll find a way to pay for it.”  That promise could be the cause of deep disappointment or crushing student debt.

In answering the question, “Should Students Apply to Reach Schools?“, Do It Yourself College Rankings discusses the pitfalls of applying to colleges that are financial reaches.

The simple answer is not to apply to any college that you can’t afford to attend.

The more detailed answer would be that it’s fine to apply to a financial reach school if everyone clearly understands that only significant financial aid would make matriculation possible should the student be accepted.  But to avoid unnecessary disappointment and stress in making the final decision where to attend, one recommendation is to get a sense about the likelihood of receiving financial aid…

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How to Save Money By Selecting The Right College: WIU and The 4-Year Price Guarantee

The Fighting Leathernecks

This January 15th,  2014 episode we talk about college costs and how to make sure cost of attendance matches with total financial aid. We speak with Andy Borst (Twitter @WIUAndyBorst) regarding rising colleges costs, and how colleges and universities like Western Illinois University (twitter @WIUNews) are locking in rates for four years at a time to keep costs low for students.

Listen to the episode: [audio https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/cmmwordpress/Podcasts/episode14-3.mp3]

Download The Episode: Ep14-03 January 15, 2014

How the government promotes rising college costs and lowered standards

If you wouldn’t give a 17 year old a credit card, why allow him to even consider a student loan?

Cost of College

Richard Vedder believes the federal government is fueling the higher education “arms race” that keeps pushing tuition costs higher and higher.

The government is providing fuel for an academics arms race that is going on all over the country by allowing kids to borrow huge amounts of money at very, very low interest rates, and many of these students are really not knowledgeable about finance and so forth. They go out; they borrow a lot of money. The colleges raise their fees more than they otherwise would. This provides extra income for the colleges, which goes for a ton of different things — luxury facilities, more administrators, higher pay for people, and the like — and makes college less affordable.

Instead of expansive loan programs, how should the government help deserving students?

Help low-income students by giving vouchers or scholarships. That would be fine. But empower individuals and provide information…

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