Tag Archives: SAP

How To Appeal Your Expected Family Contribution (EFC), Cost of Attendance (COA) and Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Suspension

How did you resolve the problem you had that led to your Satisfactory Academic Progress Suspension

Listen to the episode: [audio https://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/cmmwordpress/Podcasts/episode14-11.mp3]
On this March 12, 2014 episode we discuss the importance of the filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA ASAP with Andrew Viscariello of Black Hawk College. In addition, we are discussing three appeal types when it comes to you or your students financial aid.

Guided by we talk with Mary Lawson, Associate Director of Financial Aid at Western Illinois University (@WIUNews) , First we cover the Estimated Cost of Attendance, or ECA/COA appeals, and how to appeal that if you feel the cost profile is too low.  Next, she discusses how to appeal your initial Expected Family Contribution number, or EFC and your Financial Aid Award Letter, if it does not reflect your current financial circumstances.

Next, we talk to Angeles Fuentes of California State University, Monterey Bay, about Satisfactory Academic Progress, or SAP Appeals and how most financial aid office’s deal with those appeals.

Continue reading How To Appeal Your Expected Family Contribution (EFC), Cost of Attendance (COA) and Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Suspension

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How to Appeal Your Financial Aid Suspension for Satisfactory Academic Progress

This January 1st, 2014 episode we talk about college costs and the ever increasing debt load being taken on by families, and how sites like CollegeAbacus are helping parents to compare prices.

Listen to the episode:

Download The Episode: Ep14-01 January 1, 2014

This Weeks Two Minute Tip Episodes: July 30 – August 3

 

 

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Thanks to everyone for the response to our two-minute episodes, and to follow those up here are this weeks list of episodes.

  1. How To File A Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal
  2. How to File an EFC Redetermination Appeal
  3. How To Get Scholarship Offers As A Transfer Student
  4. How To Get More Scholarship Offers As A Returning Student
  5. How to Get More Scholarship Offers As A HIgh School Student

I hope everyone is able to gain something from these podcasts, and feel free to Send questions for next weeks schedule.

How to Write A Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal That Gets Results

3 Easy Steps To Appeal Your Financial Aid Suspension
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So you had a bad semester last year; death in the family, outside projects, too many credit hours, and the general temptation to drink until you kill brain cells are some of the many reasons thousands of people each year lose their financial aid eligibility. Now what do you? You don’t want to drop out, but you can’t pay for school on your own. If you want to win and get back on track, here are three tips that can make all the difference between getting back to school and working at Taco Bell.

Admit the Problem

Be upfront on your SAP Letter and make it clear what likely caused the problem. Did you take on to many credit hours? Did someone die in the family? Be upfront at the beginning of the letter and make it clear to the appeals committee what the issue is. Don’t sugar coat it. If it was bad, make it clear how bad it was. External problems such as a death in the family, or a heavy credit load are issues that can be remedied in future semesters.

Explain How the Problem Affected Your Grades

Its important to make it clear how the problem affected your grades. If you were carrying a heavy credit load, letting the appeals board know that you bit off more than you can chew and you are aware that it was a mistake is in your best interests. If a close relative passed away, make it clear that grief, depression, or time helping the family cope with the passing got in the way of studying.

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Make It Clear What Steps You Are Taking To Avoid Problems In Future

Its not enough to simply know what caused the problem, and how its effect on your grades; you need to know how to remedy it. If you bad grades were due to a heavy credit load, make it clear in future semesters you will keep your hours below that level. If you experienced depression due to a death or other incident, make it clear you are in or are seeking counseling from a professional (preferably an on-campus counselor) to address it.

3 Easy Steps To Appeal Your Financial Aid Suspension
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By combining the three elements of knowing the problem, knowing how it affected you, and how you will avoid it in the future, you are highly likely to have a successful appeal and get the aid you need to finish school.

 

 

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